Atlas of Human Histology – Robert L. Sorenson

Atlas of Human Histology

BOOK DETAILS

Name: Atlas of Human Histology

Author: Robert L. Sorenson

Publication: NA

Category: Medical Books

Size: 3.20 MB

Format: E-Book (PDF)

Language: ENGLISH

Total Pages: 36

Paperback: ₹NA

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Summary : Atlas of Human Histology

This atlas is a series of photographs ranging from low to high magnifications of the indi-vidual tissue specimens. The low magnification images should be used for orientation, while the higher magnification images show details of cells, tissues, and organs. Al-though every effort has been made to faithfully reproduce the colors of the tissues, a full appreciation of histological structure is best achieved by examining the original speci-mens with a microscope. This atlas is a preview of what should be observed. Villi become shorter, broader and have increasingly larger lacteals (blind ending lymphoid vessels in the core of villi) in the ileum. Frequency of goblet cells and Paneth cells increases as one progresses from the duodenum to the ileum.la rG e in t e s t i n e.

2 Summary : Atlas of Human Histology

The photomicrographs found in this atlas come from the collection of microscope slide used by medical, dental and undergraduate students of histology at the University of Minnesota. Most of these slides were prepared by Anna-Mary Carpenter M.D., Ph.D. during her tenure as Professor in the Department of Anatomy (University of Minnesota Medical School).Each tissue specimen, in its entirety, has been digitized with a high resolution 40X or 60X lens to generate virtual microscope slides. The Virtual Microscope Collection includes additional slides which complement and extend the core slide collection.

3 Summary : Atlas of Human Histology

The small intestine is divided into three regions: duodenum, jejunum and ileum. The pyloric stom-ach transitions to the duodenum at the pyloric sphincter (thick inner circular layer of the muscu-laris externa). The duodenum is the shortest seg-ment (25 cm) and receives secretions from the liver (bile) and pancreas (digestive enzymes). A distin-guishing feature of the duodenum is the presence of submucosal glands (Brunner’s glands, their appearance differs from pyloric glands only with re-spect to where they are located i.e. submucosal vs. mucosal). The jejunum and ileum have a similar appearance. Lymphoid tissue in the lamina propria progressively increases from the jejunum to the il-eum. In the ileum, permanent clusters of lymphoid nodules (Peyer’s patches) become a prominent feature.

4 Summary: Atlas of Human Histology

The main function of the large intestine is to re-absorb water and to consolidate and transport the fecal mass. The parts of the large intestine are the cecum, appendix, colon, rectum and anal ca-nal. The cecum and colon are histologically indis-tinguishable. Having no villi, the inner surface is smooth and even. The intestinal glands (crypts of Lieberkuhn) are frequent and closely packed together. The glands are simple straight tubular glands and quite long (>600 um). The two ma-jor cell types are simple columnar absorptive cells with striated border and numerous gobletcells. Paneth cells may or may not be present. Enteroendocrine cells may be seen at the base of the crypts. Lymphocytes are common in the lamina propria.

5 Summary: Atlas of Human Histology

A distin-guishing feature of the duodenum is the presence of submucosal glands (Brunner’s glands, their appearance differs from pyloric glands only with re-spect to where they are located i.e. submucosal vs. mucosal). The jejunum and ileum have a similar appearance. Lymphoid tissue in the lamina propria progressively increases from the jejunum to the il-eum. In the ileum, permanent clusters of lymphoid nodules (Peyer’s patches) become a prominent feature.

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Even when knowledge does not appear likelyto improve the quality of life of that patient. There may still be an overall benefit to them ifknowledge in a difficult area. Effective treatment techniques can be increased. Anincrease in knowledge may, at a future date, result in the introduction of effective treatment. A good example would a young woman who cannot void adequately. When often normalvoiding cannot be re-established, intermittent self-catheterisation is a good treatment,although it is resented by many patients. However, routine investigations usually contributelittle to effective management, although neurophysiological testing may show abnormalsphincter activity. Hence investigations may show the cause, although the clinician does nothave the means to reverse these abnormalities.

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